H.M Tucker at the Turn of the 20th Century

 

As you all know, Leonard’s has a long history in the photographic industry. Over one hundred years to be exact! H. M Tucker was born on May 23, 1887 inMt. Liberty,Ohio. He was only thirteen years old when he got involved with photography. In the early 1900s, H.M Tucker began an apprenticeship in Portraiture. His primary focus was family and group portraiture as well as beautiful scenic photography. I thought it would be a neat idea to research the type of equipment being used by H.M Tucker and similar photographers during that period.

A popular camera of this era was the box camera. The box camera was simple! It was made from either a cardboard box or a plastic box with a lens at one end and film at the other. Higher quality box cameras had double lenses with very minimal ability to adjust shutter speeds. In the beginning, these cameras worked best in the daylight. Soon after they would be developed with photographic flash thus allowing indoor photo usage!

 

One of the most popular types of box cameras was The Brownie Camera. It was invented by Eastman Kodak. The very first Brownie was said to be introduced in February of 1900. This was a very basic camera with a meniscus lens that took 2 ¼ inch photos on 117 film roll.

 

 Check out some photos of box camera!

 

-AK

 

 (A big thanks to The Smithsonian Institution Press for the photos and to their awesome reference book, Legacies: Collecting America’s History at the Smithsonian, for the background info!)

 

 

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